Land & Gender

land and gender

To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and promote gender equity in access to land, laws, institutions, and customary practices that are gender discriminatory need to be addressed.

To achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and promote gender-equitable land tenure, discriminatory laws, institutions, and customary practices need to be addressed

From large land acquisitions that displace communities without due compensation, to the encroachment of mining on indigenous lands, to the brunt of climate change and natural disasters, to everyday land and property deprivation by kin or state, women are typically more harshly impacted by land tenure insecurity due to discriminatory laws and lingering social bias.

For millions of rural women their nexus to the land – their lifeline, home, livelihood, and social security – often teeters on the strength of their relationship to their father, husband, brother or son. In many contexts, they lack direct, unmediated rights to the land. They face layers of discrimination in both the law and in practice, fueled by their gender, race, ethnicity, affiliation, orientation, age, or social status.  

Laws and social norms impose barriers to women’s right to own and access to land. In more than half the world, laws, and more often gender bias, and discriminatory social norms[1] entrench women’s unequal rights to access, use, inherit, transfer, control, benefit from, and own land discount their input into decisions about the fate of their land, and dismiss their compensation or redress claims when the land is taken by an investor, corporation, powerful local leader, the government, or even their kin.

Research affirms that secure land rights can be transformational[2] for women, their families, and communities. The Global Agenda for Sustainable Development[3] spotlights land as a critical driver, and regional efforts reflect growing political support for women’s land rights. Broad coalitions of NGOs and civil society rally around regional and global calls. The Deliver for Good campaign[4] spotlights women’s land rights as critical to a holistic gender-responsive implementation of the sustainable development agenda. A recently launched Africa Land Policy Initiative campaign calls for 30 percent of documented land in women’s name individually or jointly[5].

Women across the globe have formed collectives and networks and forged innovative approaches to secure land rights for communities, within communities and households. Women to Kilimanjaro mobilized women across Africa to climb up the continent’s highest peak to stand up for women’s right to land[6]. Indigenous women in Latin America and Asia – often at great personal risk – are leading movements for rights to their land and resources[7].

 

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parts indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

Indicators

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Dataset (source)
Unit Min Year Max Year Number Years Total Countries Obs Missing Values (%) Min Value Max Value Remove

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    Media

    Latest News

    Water Recycling: How mountain women are using waste water to convert taro leaves into manure

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017

     

    The taro leaf prevents seepage and holds water for more days.

    Somewhere in a mountain village in the Himalayas, a woman folds a taro leaf into a cone, fills it with soil, and sows a seed. She waters her little cone with waste water from the kitchen, creating an enabling environment for the seed to germinate in, says a woman researcher of an international institute.

    Ghana pushes for economic empowerment of women in cocoa industry

    Tuesday, March 21, 2017

     

    Ghana has made a strong case at the United Nations for the economic empowerment of women in the cocoa industry.

    At an event on the sidelines of the on-going 61st Session of the Commission on Status of Women (CSW) at the UN Headquarters in New York, it became clear that gender inequalities limit economic productivity, efficiency and undermines the development agenda.

    Despite murderous attacks, Tanzania's 'witches' fight for land

    Wednesday, March 22, 2017

     

    NYASHANA, Tanzania (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - As Tanzanian widow Ruth Zacharia raised her right arm to protect her skull from a volley of machete blows, her three attackers sliced through her hand.

    She fell to the floor; one leg slid into the kitchen fire.

    "They said: 'We have been sent by our mother because you killed our father so that you could buy that land'," the 63-year-old recalled, fidgeting with her stiff, scarred right hand.

    "I said: 'I am not a witch'... They started cutting me all over."

    Seeking research and data consultant for TI's Africa Land and Corruption Programme

    Tuesday, March 21, 2017

    Application Closing Date - 02 Apr 2017
    Job Start Date - April 2017 to July 2017
    Duration - 3 months
    Location - Remote

    Transparency International (TI) is the global civil society organisation leading the fight against corruption. Through more than 100 chapters worldwide and an international secretariat in Berlin, Germany, TI raises awareness of the damaging effects of corruption and works with partners in government, business and civil society to develop and implement effective measures to tackle it.

    Latest Blogs

    Ten Signs of an Impending Global Land Rights Revolution

    By Chris Jochnick, President and CEO of Landesa

    The development community has experienced various “revolutions” over the years – from microfinance to women’s rights, from the green revolution to sustainable development.  Each of these awakenings has improved our understanding of the challenges we face; each has transformed the development landscape, mostly for the better.

    International Women's Day - 7 women who refuse to wait for their rights

    By Rachel Crome, Digital editor at Amnesty International

    If there’s one thing we learned from January’s historic Women’s March, it’s that women are fed up of waiting. More than 3 million people – of all genders – marched worldwide for women’s rights, spurred on by US President Donald Trump’s misogynistic remarks and the growing backlash against women’s human rights around the world.

    From the Ground Up, The Multi-functionality of Land

    By Bruce H. Moore, former Director of ILC Secretariat
     

    Whereas the property rights of poor people were previously seen as a call for social justice, today land rights are understood to also be at the nexus of the economic, environmental, political and social order.

    Latest Events

    II Simpósio de Ciência do Solo: Interfaces, desafios e Inovações

    9 May 2017 to 12 May 2017

    Location

    Universidade Federal de Lavras
    Av. Doutor Sylvio Menicucci, 1001 - Kennedy, Lavras - MG,
    37200-000 Brasil Minas Gerais
    Brazil
    BR

    O ano de 2015 foi considerado pela ONU como Ano Internacional dos Solos. Por este nobre motivo e pelo aprimoramento do conhecimento das necessidades de nossos solos, alunos de graduação, pós-graduação e professores do Departamento de Ciência do Solo (DCS) da Universidade Federal de Lavras iniciaram e se prontificaram para a organização do “I Simpósio de Ciência do Solo: Funcionalidades e uso responsável dos recursos do solo” nesta universidade, que se realizou entre os dias 30 de novembro a 4 de dezembro de 2015.

    Debates

    Debate on land valuation and fair compensation

    28 November 2016 to 23 December 2016
    Facilitators
    Bjoern.Hoops
    Nicholas Tagliarino
    Marcello Demaria

    Land tenure changes are on the rise throughout the world as a result of increased migration from rural to urban areas, expansion of infrastructure, commercial pressures on agricultural land, extractive activities, and climate change. Shifts in land tenure arrangements are proceeding through compulsory acquisitions (i.e. expropriations) and voluntary market transactions, such large-scale land leases and concessions.

    Closed

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    Agricultura Familiar Brasileira: Desafios e Perspectivas de Futuro

    A Agricultura Brasileira se destaca entre as maiores do mundo e representa uma fonte de alimentos e de matéria prima para muitos países. Nela estão presentes diversos modos de fazer Agricultura, entre os quais a produção Agrícola Familiar, encontrada em extensas e importantes regiões do país. A agricultura familiar no Brasil é crescentemente uma forma social de produção reconhecida pela sociedade brasileira, por suas contribuições materiais e imateriais.

    Resource information

    March 2017

    2016 DFID Land Portfolio Overview

    The Portfolio Overview provides a global overview of DFID's programmes working on land issues and highlights lessons and trends emerging from major land programmes over recent years.

    This year's Portfolio Overview also provides an in-depth review of DFID’s land programmes and interventions in Nigeria and highlights opportunities for existing and new programmes to tackle land issues in their pursuit of inclusive economic growth.

    Resource information

    February 2017

    The Dynamics Of Land Deals in Africa

    Looking at several large-scale land deals in Mozambique, Tanzania and Zambia, this extraordinary documentary highlights the nuanced impacts of these investments. Small-scale farmers and producers, national government officials, and African policy-makers unpack the deals, showing that there are winners and losers when providing investors access to large tracts of land in Africa. For example, land deals impact differently on women and youth, and altering land regimes also impacts on access to other natural resources such as water, fish, and local indigenous vegetables.

    Resource information

    February 2017