This dataset contains a range of environmental indicators from the World Bank (Source: http://data.worldbank.org/indicator)

Indicators in this dataset

Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

Average precipitation (mm per year)

Average precipitation is the long-term average in depth (over space and time) of annual precipitation in the country, measured in millimeter per year. Precipitation is defined as any kind of water that falls from clouds as a liquid or a solid. The agriculture sector is the most water-intensive sector, and water delivery in agriculture is increasingly important. Data on irrigated agricultural land and data on average precipitation illustrate how countries obtain water for agricultural use. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=AG.LND.PRCP.MM)

Bird species, threatened

Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known. Birds are listed for countries included within their breeding or wintering ranges. The number of threatened species is an important measure of the immediate need for conservation in an area. Global analyses of the status of threatened species have been carried out for few groups of organisms. Only for mammals, birds, and amphibians has the status of virtually all known species been assessed. Threatened species are defined using the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) classification: endangered (in danger of extinction and unlikely to survive if causal factors continue operating) and vulnerable (likely to move into the endangered category in the near future if causal factors continue operating). The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species is widely recognized as the most comprehensive, objective global approach for evaluating the conservation status of plant and animal species. (source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.BIR.THRD.NO).

Coal rents (% of GDP)

This indicator measures coal rents as a share of the gross domestic product (GDP) of a given country. Coal rents are the difference between the value of both hard and soft coal production at world prices and their total costs of production. Accounting for the contribution of natural resources to economic output is important in building an analytical framework for sustainable development. In some countries earnings from natural resources, especially from fossil fuels and minerals, account for a sizable share of GDP, and much of these earnings come in the form of economic rents - revenues above the cost of extracting the resources. Natural resources give rise to economic rents because they are not produced. For produced goods and services competitive forces expand supply until economic profits are driven to zero, but natural resources in fixed supply often command returns well in excess of their cost of production. Rents from nonrenewable resources - fossil fuels and minerals - as well as rents from overharvesting of forests indicate the liquidation of a country's capital stock. When countries use such rents to support current consumption rather than to invest in new capital to replace what is being used up, they are, in effect, borrowing against their future. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=NY.GDP.COAL.RT.ZS)

Fish species, threatened

Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known. Fish species are based on Froese, R. and Pauly, D. (eds). 2008. The number of threatened species is an important measure of the immediate need for conservation in an area. Global analyses of the status of threatened species have been carried out for few groups of organisms. Only for mammals, birds, and amphibians has the status of virtually all known species been assessed. Threatened species are defined using the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) classification: endangered (in danger of extinction and unlikely to survive if causal factors continue operating) and vulnerable (likely to move into the endangered category in the near future if causal factors continue operating). The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species is widely recognized as the most comprehensive, objective global approach for evaluating the conservation status of plant and animal species. (source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.FSH.THRD.NO)

Forest rents (% of GDP)

This indicator measures forest rents as a share of the gross domestic product (GDP) of a given country. Forest rents are roundwood harvest times the product of average prices and a region-specific rental rate. Accounting for the contribution of natural resources to economic output is important in building an analytical framework for sustainable development. In some countries earnings from natural resources, especially from fossil fuels and minerals, account for a sizable share of GDP, and much of these earnings come in the form of economic rents - revenues above the cost of extracting the resources. Natural resources give rise to economic rents because they are not produced. For produced goods and services competitive forces expand supply until economic profits are driven to zero, but natural resources in fixed supply often command returns well in excess of their cost of production. Rents from nonrenewable resources - fossil fuels and minerals - as well as rents from overharvesting of forests indicate the liquidation of a country's capital stock. When countries use such rents to support current consumption rather than to invest in new capital to replace what is being used up, they are, in effect, borrowing against their future. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=NY.GDP.FRST.RT.ZS)

Mammal species, threatened

Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known. Mammal species are mammals excluding whales and porpoises. The number of threatened species is an important measure of the immediate need for conservation in an area. Global analyses of the status of threatened species have been carried out for few groups of organisms. Only for mammals, birds, and amphibians has the status of virtually all known species been assessed. Threatened species are defined using the International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) classification: endangered (in danger of extinction and unlikely to survive if causal factors continue operating) and vulnerable (likely to move into the endangered category in the near future if causal factors continue operating). The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species is widely recognized as the most comprehensive, objective global approach for evaluating the conservation status of plant and animal species. (source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.MAM.THRD.NO)

Marine protected areas (% of territorial waters)

This indicator measures the proportion of marine protected areas as a share of the total territorial waters in a country. Marine protected areas are areas of intertidal or subtidal terrain--and overlying water and associated flora and fauna and historical and cultural features--that have been reserved by law or other effective means to protect part or all of the enclosed environment. As threats to biodiversity mount, the international community is increasingly focusing on conserving diversity. Deforestation is a major cause of loss of biodiversity, and habitat conservation is vital for stemming this loss. Conservation efforts have focused on protecting areas of high biodiversity. Increasing the proportion of terrestrial and marine areas protected helps defend vulnerable plant and animal species and safeguard biodiversity. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=ER.MRN.PTMR.ZS)

Mineral rents (% of GDP)

This indicator measures mineral rents as a share of the gross domestic product (GDP) of a given country. Mineral rents are the difference between the value of production for a stock of minerals at world prices and their total costs of production. Minerals included in the calculation are tin, gold, lead, zinc, iron, copper, nickel, silver, bauxite, and phosphate. Accounting for the contribution of natural resources to economic output is important in building an analytical framework for sustainable development. In some countries earnings from natural resources, especially from fossil fuels and minerals, account for a sizable share of GDP, and much of these earnings come in the form of economic rents - revenues above the cost of extracting the resources. Natural resources give rise to economic rents because they are not produced. For produced goods and services competitive forces expand supply until economic profits are driven to zero, but natural resources in fixed supply often command returns well in excess of their cost of production. Rents from nonrenewable resources - fossil fuels and minerals - as well as rents from overharvesting of forests indicate the liquidation of a country's capital stock. When countries use such rents to support current consumption rather than to invest in new capital to replace what is being used up, they are, in effect, borrowing against their future. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=NY.GDP.MINR.RT.ZS)

Natural gas rents (% of GDP)

This indicator measures natural gas rents as a share of the gross domestic product (GDP) of a given country.Natural gas rents are the difference between the value of natural gas production at world prices and total costs of production. Accounting for the contribution of natural resources to economic output is important in building an analytical framework for sustainable development. In some countries earnings from natural resources, especially from fossil fuels and minerals, account for a sizable share of GDP, and much of these earnings come in the form of economic rents - revenues above the cost of extracting the resources. Natural resources give rise to economic rents because they are not produced. For produced goods and services competitive forces expand supply until economic profits are driven to zero, but natural resources in fixed supply often command returns well in excess of their cost of production. Rents from nonrenewable resources - fossil fuels and minerals - as well as rents from overharvesting of forests indicate the liquidation of a country's capital stock. When countries use such rents to support current consumption rather than to invest in new capital to replace what is being used up, they are, in effect, borrowing against their future. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=NY.GDP.NGAS.RT.ZS)

Oil rents (% of GDP)

This indicator measures oil rents as a share of the gross domestic product (GDP) of a given country. Oil rents are the difference between the value of crude oil production at world prices and total costs of production. Accounting for the contribution of natural resources to economic output is important in building an analytical framework for sustainable development. In some countries earnings from natural resources, especially from fossil fuels and minerals, account for a sizable share of GDP, and much of these earnings come in the form of economic rents - revenues above the cost of extracting the resources. Natural resources give rise to economic rents because they are not produced. For produced goods and services competitive forces expand supply until economic profits are driven to zero, but natural resources in fixed supply often command returns well in excess of their cost of production. Rents from nonrenewable resources - fossil fuels and minerals - as well as rents from overharvesting of forests indicate the liquidation of a country's capital stock. When countries use such rents to support current consumption rather than to invest in new capital to replace what is being used up, they are, in effect, borrowing against their future. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=NY.GDP.PETR.RT.ZS)