WB - Climate Change Indicators

This dataset contains a range of climate change indicators from the World Bank (Source: http://data.worldbank.org/indicator)

Indicators in this dataset

Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

Agricultural methane emissions (% of total)

This indicator measures agricultural methane (CH4) emissions as a percentage of the total. Agricultural methane emissions are methane emissions from animals, animal waste, rice production, agricultural waste burning (nonenergy, on-site), and savannah burning. The carbon dioxide emissions of a country are only an indicator of one greenhouse gas. For a more complete idea of how a country influences climate change, gases such as methane and nitrous oxide should be taken into account. This is particularly important in agricultural economies.(Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.ATM.METH.AG.ZS)

Agricultural methane emissions (thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent)

This indicator measures agricultural methane emissions (CH4) in terms of thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent. Agricultural methane emissions are methane emissions from animals, animal waste, rice production, agricultural waste burning (nonenergy, on-site), and savannah burning. The carbon dioxide emissions of a country are only an indicator of one greenhouse gas. For a more complete idea of how a country influences climate change, gases such as methane and nitrous oxide should be taken into account. This is particularly important in agricultural economies. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.ATM.METH.AG.KT.CE)

Agricultural nitrous oxide emissions (% of total)

This indicator measures agricultural nitrous oxide (N20) emissions as a percentage of the total. Agricultural methane emissions are methane emissions from animals, animal waste, rice production, agricultural waste burning (nonenergy, on-site), and savannah burning. The carbon dioxide emissions of a country are only an indicator of one greenhouse gas. For a more complete idea of how a country influences climate change, gases such as methane and nitrous oxide should be taken into account. This is particularly important in agricultural economies.(Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.ATM.NOXE.AG.ZS)

Agricultural nitrous oxide emissions (thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent)

This indicator measures agricultural nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in terms of thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent. Agricultural nitrous oxide emissions are emissions produced through fertilizer use (synthetic and animal manure), animal waste management, agricultural waste burning (nonenergy, on-site), and savannah burning. The carbon dioxide emissions of a country are only an indicator of one greenhouse gas. For a more complete idea of how a country influences climate change, gases such as methane and nitrous oxide should be taken into account. This is particularly important in agricultural economies. (source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.ATM.NOXE.AG.KT.CE)

CO2 emissions (kg per 2011 PPP $ of GDP)

This indicator measures carbon dioxide (CO2) emission in kilograms per dollar (expressed at the 2011 Purchasing Parity Power) of GDP. Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is naturally occurring gas fixed by photosynthesis into organic matter. A byproduct of fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, it is also emitted from land use changes and other industrial processes. It is the principal anthropogenic greenhouse gas that affects the Earth's radiative balance. It is the reference gas against which other greenhouse gases are measured, thus having a Global Warming Potential of 1. Burning of carbon-based fuels since the industrial revolution has rapidly increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, increasing the rate of global warming and causing anthropogenic climate change. It is also a major source of ocean acidification since it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid. The addition of man-made greenhouse gases to the Atmosphere disturbs the earth's radiative balance. This is leading to an increase in the earth's surface temperature and to related effects on climate, sea level rise and world agriculture.(Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.ATM.CO2E.PP.GD.KD)

CO2 emissions (kt)

This indicator measures carbon dioxide (CO2) emission in kilotonnes. Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is naturally occurring gas fixed by photosynthesis into organic matter. A byproduct of fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, it is also emitted from land use changes and other industrial processes. It is the principal anthropogenic greenhouse gas that affects the Earth's radiative balance. It is the reference gas against which other greenhouse gases are measured, thus having a Global Warming Potential of 1. Burning of carbon-based fuels since the industrial revolution has rapidly increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, increasing the rate of global warming and causing anthropogenic climate change. It is also a major source of ocean acidification since it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid. The addition of man-made greenhouse gases to the Atmosphere disturbs the earth's radiative balance. This is leading to an increase in the earth's surface temperature and to related effects on climate, sea level rise and world agriculture. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.ATM.CO2E.KT)

Disaster risk reduction progress score (1-5 scale; 5=best)

Disaster risk reduction progress score is an average of self-assessment scores, ranging from 1 to 5 (where 5 = best) submitted by countries under Priority 1 of the Hyogo Framework National Progress Reports. The Hyogo Framework is a global blueprint for disaster risk reduction efforts that was adopted by 168 countries in 2005. Assessments of "Priority 1" include four indicators that reflect the degree to which countries have prioritized disaster risk reduction and the strengthening of relevant institutions. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.CLC.DRSK.XQ)

Droughts, floods, extreme temperatures (% of population, average 1990-2009)

Droughts, floods and extreme temperatures is the annual average percentage of the population that is affected by natural disasters classified as either droughts, floods, or extreme temperature events. A drought is an extended period of time characterized by a deficiency in a region's water supply that is the result of constantly below average precipitation. A drought can lead to losses to agriculture, affect inland navigation and hydropower plants, and cause a lack of drinking water and famine. A flood is a significant rise of water level in a stream, lake, reservoir or coastal region. Extreme temperature events are either cold waves or heat waves. A cold wave can be both a prolonged period of excessively cold weather and the sudden invasion of very cold air over a large area. Along with frost it can cause damage to agriculture, infrastructure, and property. A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessively hot and sometimes also humid weather relative to normal climate patterns of a certain region. Population affected is the number of people injured, left homeless or requiring immediate assistance during a period of emergency resulting from a natural disaster; it can also include displaced or evacuated people. Average percentage of population affected is calculated by dividing the sum of total affected for the period stated by the sum of the annual population figures for the period stated. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.CLC.MDAT.ZS)

GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF (Mt of CO2 equivalent)

GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF refers to changes in atmospheric levels of all greenhouse gases attributable to forest and land-use change activities, including but not limited to (1) emissions and removals of CO2 from decreases or increases in biomass stocks due to forest management, logging, fuelwood collection, etc.; (2) conversion of existing forests and natural grasslands to other land uses; (3) removal of CO2 from the abandonment of formerly managed lands (e.g. croplands and pastures); and (4) emissions and removals of CO2 in soil associated with land-use change and management. For Annex-I countries under the UNFCCC, these data are drawn from the annual GHG inventories submitted to the UNFCCC by each country; for non-Annex-I countries, data are drawn from the most recently submitted National Communication where available. Because of differences in reporting years and methodologies, these data are not generally considered comparable across countries. Data are in million metric tons. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.CLC.GHGR.MT.CE)

Methane emissions (% change from 1990)

This indicator measures the percentage change in methane (CH4) emissions from 1990 levels. Methane emissions are those stemming from human activities such as agriculture and from industrial methane production. Each year of data shows the percentage change to that year from 1990. The carbon dioxide emissions of a country are only an indicator of one greenhouse gas. For a more complete idea of how a country influences climate change, gases such as methane and nitrous oxide should be taken into account. This is particularly important in agricultural economies. The emissions are usually expressed in carbon dioxide equivalents using the global warming potential, which allows the effective contributions of different gases to be compared. A kilogram of methane is 21 times as effective at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere as a kilogram of carbon dioxide within 100 years. (Source: http://databank.worldbank.org/data/reports.aspx?source=2&type=metadata&series=EN.ATM.METH.ZG)