Zimbabwe

ZWE

Zimbabwe

Land issues—including extreme racial disparities in land ownership, insecurity of land tenure and property rights, control over fertile land and mineral reserves, and insecurity of community land rights—have played a central role in Zimbabwe’s history which continues to this day.

Located in Southern Africa, between South Africa and Zambia, Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia) achieved independence from colonial rule in 1980. Though rich in mineral resources, the vast majority of Zimbabweans live in poverty. By January 2009, only 6% of the population worked in the formal sector.

Since independence, the country has undergone several phases of land reform in order to address racial disparities and inequalities created by colonial rule; at independence, the vast majority of privately owned land, including an estimated 70% of the most fertile land, was held by whites who comprised just 5% of the population. Today, some of Zimbabwe’s main land issues include: land tenure insecurity, women’s land rights, community land rights; and environmental degradation.

The implementation of a 2008 power-sharing agreement between Zimbabwe’s political parties, ZANU–PF and the two formations of MDC, which identifies land as a central issue and makes a number of land-related commitments, will play a major role in the management of the country’s natural resources and will be critical to Zimbabwe’s economic recovery.

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parts indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

Indicators

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Infographics

Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    Legend
    • Very Good Practice
    • Good Practice
    • Weak Practice
    • Very Weak Practice
    • Missing Value

    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
    • Fully adopt
    • Partially adopt
    • Not adopted
    • Missing Value

    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

    Latest News

    8 March 2017

    Chengetai Zonke lost much of her maize crop to drought last year. When it came to planting again, she decided to reduce her stake in what has become a recurrent climate change gamble.

    At her homestead in Chiware, in Zimbabwe’s northeastern Manicaland Province, the 52-year-old farmer explained why. “I’ve abandoned tilling the bigger fields to avoid the risk of putting more land under crops that may fail due to lack of rain or too much rain,” she told IRIN. “Replanting costs money, which is scarce.”

    Latest Blog

    By Mary Jane Ncube, Farai Shone Mutondoro and Manase Chiweshe

    As political parties gear up for the 2018 national elections in Zimbabwe, urban land appears to be emerging as an important campaigning tool for ruling party Zanu PF. 

    Amid recent mass public protests against corruption, economic decline and an import ban on basic commodities, young people who showed loyalty to the party werepromised land.  

    The Sugar Rush in South Africa - land grabs, land rights, human rights, agriculture

    By Ian Scoones, Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies, and the Director of the ESRC STEPS Centre at Sussex

    The expansion of sugar production in southern Africa has been dramatic. From its early beginnings in Natal to the huge commercial estates across the region established during the colonial era, new investments are being planned. The land rush in southern Africa is often a sugar rush, with the ‘white gold’ promising riches to governments, local elites and large corporates alike.

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    Library

    Displaying 1 - 6 of 623
    Reports & Research
    December 2007

    Food availability, access, stability and utilization are all part of the multi-dimensional nature of food security. The “availability” aspect, discussed here, refers to the availability of sufficient quantities of food of appropriate quality, supplied through domestic production or inputs.

    Journal Articles & Books
    December 2000

    This seven-page country report is short but identifies the current situation of data collection in the country. The first part describes the overall situation as well as the main wood products of the country. The second part describes the main institutions involved in the overall collection, analysis and dissemination process of the data related to these products followed by some production figures. The third part of the report presents an evaluation of the data while the fourth part suggests some measures to improve the overall statistical process.

    Journal Articles & Books
    December 2016

    L’Évaluation des ressources forestières mondiales 2015 est le fruit d’un effort collectif des pays, ayant impliqué quelque 300 correspondants nationaux, la FAO et ses partenaires. Mis en oeuvre par six partenaires dans le cadre de divers processus, le Questionnaire concerté sur les ressources forestières couvre 88 pour cent des forêts mondiales. Cette collaboration permet d’améliorer la cohérence des données tout en réduisant le fardeau des pays quant à l’établissement des rapports.

    Journal Articles & Books
    December 1999

    Une analyse de l'état des plantations forestières ainsi que des tendances actuelles du secteur forestier aux niveaux mondial et régional. Le rapport traite des mesures à tenir en compte en ce qui concerne le développement des plantations forestières. Par ailleurs, la perspective des plantations forestières est présentée sous la forme de différents scénarios qui se basent sur la future croissance