Zambia

ZMB

Zambia

Zambia is a largely rural country with low incomes, with, 34% of the total land is used for agriculture and 57% as forests.  Approximately 60% of the population in Zambia is rural, and poverty is mostly widespread in rural areas. Agricultural productivity is low, due in part to the weather and lack of infrastructure, as well as internal migration from rural to urban areas that are overpopulated access to basic services cannot be guaranteed.

While the constitution of Zambia recognizes and protects property rights, the state is entitled to expropriate land only in order to implement development plans. The Land Act of 1995 recognized two tenure system - customary tenure and leasehold rights to state land, and also restricts the authority of the state to sell land to foreigners. In 2009, the draft constitution established principles governing land tenure, equitable access to land and resources, land rights for women, land tenure security, sustainable management of resources, environmental protection and efficient mechanisms for dispute resolution.

Frequent reasons for land disputes include encroachment and boundaries, eviction by the government, land conversions and the increasing number of commercial farms.  Generally, local authorities have the power to settle land disputes in accordance with the existing hierarchical structure. 

Source of the narrative

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parts indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

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Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    • Very Good Practice
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    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
    • Fully adopt
    • Partially adopt
    • Not adopted
    • Missing Value

    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

    Latest News

    26 May 2017

    Colonialism brought large-scale farming to Africa, promising modernisation and jobs – but often dispossessing people and exploiting workers. Now, after several decades of independence, and with investor interest growing, African governments are once again promoting large plantations and estates. But the new corporate interest in African agriculture has been criticised as a “land grab”.

    12 May 2017

     

    Sixty percent of Zambians are small-scale farmers, who make up many of the nation's poorest people but produce 85 percent of its food

    LONDON, May 12 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Zambia's smallholder farmers could be made squatters on their own land as the country opens up to farming multinationals in an effort to boost its economy, said a United Nations expert.

    By: Linda Nyondo
    Date: September 21st 2016
    Source: Zambia Daily Mail

    A GROUP of African women including Zambians are next month expected to climb Mount Kilimanjaro to advocate for women’s land rights.

    Action Aid communications officer Hellen Mwale confirmed the development in a statement in Lusaka recently.

    By: Stephen Brooks
    04 December 2015

    Joseph Zulu never uses the term “climate-smart agriculture,” even as he proudly points out the fertilizer trees he planted between rows of crops on his field in Zambia’s eastern province. But whether he uses the term or not, Zulu is a wonderful example of how climate-smart agriculture can be incorporated into traditional farming environments.

    Latest Blog

    The Sugar Rush in South Africa - land grabs, land rights, human rights, agriculture

    By Ian Scoones, Professorial Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies, and the Director of the ESRC STEPS Centre at Sussex

    The expansion of sugar production in southern Africa has been dramatic. From its early beginnings in Natal to the huge commercial estates across the region established during the colonial era, new investments are being planned. The land rush in southern Africa is often a sugar rush, with the ‘white gold’ promising riches to governments, local elites and large corporates alike.

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    Library

    Displaying 1 - 6 of 684
    Journal Articles & Books
    December 2012

    This publication aims to provide practical guidance for population and housing census and agricultural census planners looking to implement a cost-effective census strategy by coordinating the population and housing census with the agricultural census.

    Reports & Research
    December 2016

    This report uses data from a two-year impact evaluation to analyse the impact of the Ethiopia Social Cash Transfer Pilot Programme (SCTPP) on household behaviour and decision-making, including agricultural production and other income-generating activities, labour supply, the accumulation of productive assets, access to credit and food security.

    Journal Articles & Books
    February 2016

    Accurate and consistent information on forest area and forest area change is important given the reporting requirements for countries to access results based payments for REDD+ . Forest area change estimates usually provide data on the extent of human activity resulting in emissions (e.g. from deforestation) or removals (e.g. from afforestation), also called activity data (AD). A basic methodological approach to estimate greenhouse gas emissions and removals (IPCC, 2003), is to multiply AD with a coefficient that quantifies emissions per unit ‘activity’ (e.g.

    Journal Articles & Books
    December 2016

    تقرّ الخطوط التوجيهية الطوعية بشأن الحوكمة المسؤولة لحيازة الأراضي، ومصايد الأسماك، والغابات، في سياق الأمن الغذائي الوطني بأنّ الاستثمارات المسؤولة التي ينفّذها القطاعان العام والخاص أساسية لتحسين الأمن الغذائي، وتدعو إلى استثمارات تصون مستخدمي الأراضي ومالكيها من خطر نزع ملكيتهم لحقوق الحيازة المشروعة. ويوفّر هذا الدليل الفني توجيهات مفصّلة للسلطات الحكومية المنخرطة في جهود تشجيع الاستثمارات والموافقة عليها ورصدها في جميع مراحل دورة الاستثمار، بشأن الإجراءات التي يمكن اتخاذها لإرساء بيئة مؤاتية للاستثمارات المسؤولة والمستدامة.