Sudan

SDN

Sudan

Several conflicts in Sudan have prevented its development and caused massive population displacement. One third of Sudan is classified as desert, 60% of its total population is rural and 31% of its GDP derives from agriculture. Agricultural land continues to represent an important resource, especially since the independence of South Sudan, where the majority of oil reserves are found.

The Interim National Constitution does not specifically recognize land rights and ownership, but it calls for the establishment of a National Land Commission to guide the development of a land policy, the creation of mechanisms for dispute resolution and the recognition of customary rights. The Land Resettlement and Registration Act establishes land settlement and registration of rights, and the Civil Transaction Act of 1984 provides the state with the ownership of unregistered land as well as the authority over land transactions, transfers, inheritance and usufruct rights. In addition, the Local Government Act of 1998 assigns the management and administration of land to local authorities.

Despite the end of the civil war, Sudan continues to experience internal conflicts, many of which are related to the management of natural resources, particularly oil and land, border demarcation and government expropriation of land. In the majority of cases, land disputes are resolved by traditional institutions and customary courts.

Source of the narrative

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parties indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

Indicators

Indicators Year Value Unit Dataset Source Remove

Loading data ...

Compare countries

Mapping

Loading data ...

Infographics

Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

Please, select year and panels to show the info.

    Legend
    • Very Good Practice
    • Good Practice
    • Weak Practice
    • Very Weak Practice
    • Missing Value

    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
    • Fully adopt
    • Partially adopt
    • Not adopted
    • Missing Value

    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

    Latest News

    Western Asia
    Argentina
    Brazil
    Ethiopia
    Mauritania
    Philippines
    Poland
    Saudi Arabia
    Sudan
    Ukraine
    United States of America

    By: Kieran Cooke
    Date: October 5th 2016
    Source: Middle East Eye

    After food costs spike, Saudis spent billions buying up farm land around the world. Who benefits exactly and can the spree continue?

    hey control rice farms in Ethiopia, Sudan and the Philippines, cattle ranches in California and Arizona, wheat fields in Ukraine and Poland, ranches in Argentina and Brazil and shrimp producers in Mauritania.

    A girl farms the land during the rainy season outside Gereida, Sudan, July 25, 2012. (photo by REUTERS/Albert Gonzalez Farran/UNAMID)  Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/ja/originals/2015/08/egypt-sudan-agriculture-irrigation-cooperation-blue-nile
    Egypt
    Sudan

    CAIRO — Amid Egypt’s water scarcity, which threatens to worsen the country’s food shortage, Cairo is working to form agricultural alliances outside its borders. The efforts — which have been in place as limited experiments since the 1980s under Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak — include sending Egyptian farmers to cultivate land in Sudan and Congo, transfer their expertise to those countries and take advantage of the available water to cover the food needs of the Egyptian people.

    Partners

    Library

    Displaying 1 - 6 of 228
    Reports & Research
    July 2017

     The Abyei Administrative Area (AAA) is a contested zone located on the central border between South Sudan and Sudan. Its status has remained unresolved since South Sudan seceded from Sudan in 2011, and the governments failed to agree on the border division. A United Nations peacekeeping mission, the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA), has since monitored the situation. It is entrusted with overseeing demilitarisation and maintaining security in the area.

    Reports & Research
    December 2016

    This note focuses on the topic of access to land and land governance in protracted crises, providing some possible solutions illustrated by case studies from FAO interventions in such contexts. Protracted crisis represent a signal of alert on the fact that approaches proposed so far where not enough to deal with such a complexity. This is why a renewed thinking is needed, based on the concrete observations of local dynamics, making an effort to understand the positions and interests of the many diverse parties involved and moving out from a sectorial vision, towards a more holistic one.