Sudan

SDN

Sudan

Several conflicts in Sudan have prevented its development and caused massive population displacement. One third of Sudan is classified as desert, 60% of its total population is rural and 31% of its GDP derives from agriculture. Agricultural land continues to represent an important resource, especially since the independence of South Sudan, where the majority of oil reserves are found.

The Interim National Constitution does not specifically recognize land rights and ownership, but it calls for the establishment of a National Land Commission to guide the development of a land policy, the creation of mechanisms for dispute resolution and the recognition of customary rights. The Land Resettlement and Registration Act establishes land settlement and registration of rights, and the Civil Transaction Act of 1984 provides the state with the ownership of unregistered land as well as the authority over land transactions, transfers, inheritance and usufruct rights. In addition, the Local Government Act of 1998 assigns the management and administration of land to local authorities.

Despite the end of the civil war, Sudan continues to experience internal conflicts, many of which are related to the management of natural resources, particularly oil and land, border demarcation and government expropriation of land. In the majority of cases, land disputes are resolved by traditional institutions and customary courts.

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Infographics

Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    Legend
    • Very Good Practice
    • Good Practice
    • Weak Practice
    • Very Weak Practice
    • Missing Value

    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
    • Fully adopt
    • Partially adopt
    • Not adopted
    • Missing Value

    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

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    Western Asia
    Argentina
    Brazil
    Ethiopia
    Mauritania
    Philippines
    Poland
    Saudi Arabia
    Sudan
    Ukraine
    United States of America

    By: Kieran Cooke
    Date: October 5th 2016
    Source: Middle East Eye

    After food costs spike, Saudis spent billions buying up farm land around the world. Who benefits exactly and can the spree continue?

    hey control rice farms in Ethiopia, Sudan and the Philippines, cattle ranches in California and Arizona, wheat fields in Ukraine and Poland, ranches in Argentina and Brazil and shrimp producers in Mauritania.

    A girl farms the land during the rainy season outside Gereida, Sudan, July 25, 2012. (photo by REUTERS/Albert Gonzalez Farran/UNAMID)  Read more: http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/ja/originals/2015/08/egypt-sudan-agriculture-irrigation-cooperation-blue-nile
    Egypt
    Sudan

    CAIRO — Amid Egypt’s water scarcity, which threatens to worsen the country’s food shortage, Cairo is working to form agricultural alliances outside its borders. The efforts — which have been in place as limited experiments since the 1980s under Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak — include sending Egyptian farmers to cultivate land in Sudan and Congo, transfer their expertise to those countries and take advantage of the available water to cover the food needs of the Egyptian people.

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    Library

    Displaying 1 - 6 of 212
    Peer-reviewed publication
    October 2013

    The paper analyzes land use changes, notably cropland expansion, in SE-Niger from the mid-1980s to 2011. It scrutinizes land use trajectories and investigates how cultivation shifts between dune landscapes and valleys (bas-fonds) in response to climate, population pressure, and sociocultural opportunities, combining lenses rooted in land change science and the notions of double exposure and human-environmental timelines. Specifically, the interest is directed towards exploring the value of different methods of land use data harvesting.

    Peer-reviewed publication
    October 2014

    The Sahel has been the focus of scientific interest in environmental-human dynamics and interactions. The objective of the present study is to contribute to the recent debate on the re-greening of Sahel. The paper examines the dynamics of barren land in the Sahel of Burkina Faso through analysis of remotely-sensed and rainfall data from 1975–2011. Discussions with farmers and land management staff have helped to understand the anthropogenic efforts toward soil restoration to enable the subsistence farming agriculture.

    Peer-reviewed publication
    October 2014

    Climatic stress and anthropogenic disturbances have caused significant environmental changes in the Sahel. In this context, the importance of soil is often underrepresented. Thus, we analyze and discuss the interdependency of soil and vegetation by classifying soil types and its woody cover for a region in the Senegalese Ferlo. Clustering of 28 soil parameters led to four soil types which correspond with local Wolof denotations: Dek, Bowel, Dior and Bardial.

    Peer-reviewed publication
    December 2014

    Crown diameter and tree density were measured in 52 communities in the Sudan-Sahel using satellite imagery to determine the relationships between rainfall and distance from community center to crown size diameter and tree density. As distance from the community center increased, tree density and crown diameter decreased. As rainfall increased, tree density decreased while crown diameter increased. Distance from the community center is a proxy for age since urbanization and our results indicate that older parts of communities show longer and more consistent tree management.

    Reports & Research
    December 2001

    The current publication «State of the Forest Genetic Resources in the dry north of Nigeria» is issue of country national report presented at The Sub-Regional Workshop FAO/IPGRI/ICRAF on the conservation, management, sustainable utilization and enhancement of forest genetic resources in Sahelian and North-Sudanian Africa (Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, 22-24 September 1998).

    Reports & Research
    December 2015

    De plus en plus d’éléments tendent à démontrer que l’investissement dans le secteur agricole des pays en développement est l’un des moyens les plus efficaces pour réduire la pauvreté et la faim. Les investissements agricoles peuvent produire des avantages très divers en faveur du développement. On ne peut cependant pas s’attendre à ce que ces avantages se produisent automatiquement, et certaines formes d’investissement à grande échelle comportent des risques pour les pays hôtes.