Pakistan

Land in Pakistan is highly concentrated, which is source of poverty and instability in the country. Land is considered the principal asset in the rural economy, but unequal access to land and inefficient systems of water management have contributed to land degradation, poverty and instability. In Pakistan, 63% of the total population is rural and 43% is landless and lacks access to water or an irrigation system.

The Constitution in Pakistan established that all laws must be aligned with the Qur’an. The constitution recognized the right to acquire, hold and dispose of property for every citizen. There are several formal laws governing land tenure in Pakistan, mostly concerning land transactions and registration. Customary laws differ among provinces and geographical subdivisions and are enforced by local tribunals.

Land disputes in Pakistan are prevalent in rural areas. A revenue court system resolves land conflicts related to land documentation, tenancy, land revenues and transactions; the court is also designed to provide local and rapid solutions for land conflicts. However, these entities have receive significant criticism for corruption as well as the complexity and time consuming nature of the system. 

Source

Indicators

Total spending for agricultural reserch measured measured as a share of the value added from agriculture, forestry and fishing activities

Measurement unit
Percentage

Distribution of agricultural holders by sex (female - Share %) according to the FAO Land and Gender Database.

Measurement unit
Percentage

GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates.

Measurement unit
PPP$ 2011

Land area is the total area (1'000 Ha) of the country excluding area under inland water bodies.

Measurement unit
1'000 Ha

Total funding for programmes still ongoing in January 2016 (US $).

Measurement unit
US$ (Current)

Total number of programmes still ongoing in January 2016

Measurement unit
Number

Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

Measurement unit
Number

Rural population refers to the share (%) of people living in rural areas as defined by national statistical offices. It is calculated as the ratio between Urban Population and Total Population.

Measurement unit
Percentage

Mapping

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Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

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Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

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Arable land (1'000 Ha) is the land under temporary agricultural crops (multiple-cropped areas are counted only once), temporary meadows for mowing or pasture, land under market and kitchen gardens

Measurement unit
1'000 Ha

It measures the area (1'000 Ha) covered by forest.

Measurement unit
1'000 Ha

Land area is the total area (1'000 Ha) of the country excluding area under inland water bodies.

Permanent crops (1'000 Ha) - land cultivated with long-term crops which do not have to be replanted for several years (such as cocoa and coffee); land under trees and shrubs producing flowers, such

Measurement unit
1000 Ha

Permanent meadows and pastures - land used permanently (five years or more) to grow herbaceous forage crops, either cultivated or growing wild (wild prairie or grazing land).

Measurement unit
1000 Ha

Infographics

Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests (VGGT)


Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
  • Fully adopt
  • Partially adopt
  • Not adopted
  • Missing Value

Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parties indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

Media

Latest News

pakistan infrastructure
23 August 2017
Pakistan

Investment in urban infrastructure such as new roads, public utilities or parks invariably increases real-estate prices. In Pakistan, stories of riches earned overnight due to new highways passing through agricultural lands are common.

Flickr Pakistan forest
2 August 2017
Pakistan

LAHORE: The Punjab government has decided to lease a total of 99,077 acres of land in 187 forest lots of various sizes in four districts of South Punjab to the investors for 15 years for commercial forestry.

This was revealed by Awais Leghari, Chairman, South Punjab Forest Company (SPFC), while addressing a press conference at the office of SPFC here Monday. He gave an overview of SPFC and its initiative to promote afforestation in South Punjab under Public Private Partnership (PPP) mode.

27 February 2017
Pakistan

By:MOHAMMAD HUSSAIN KHAN 

Date: February 2017

Source: Dawn

SHRINKING riverine and inland forests have significantly reduced production and supply of wood required for soil fertility, livestock’s fodder, firewood and a growing furniture market.

27 January 2017
Pakistan

Date: 27 January 2017

Source: Daily Times

The South Punjab Minorities Land Rights Forum on Thursday pointed out residential and agricultural land issues, saying the minorities were forced to vacate lands where they had memories of their childhood and origin despite being the indigenous people of the land.

Organizations

Library

Displaying 1 - 6 of 541
Reports & Research
Policy Papers & Briefs
May 2017
Pakistan
Southern Asia

This paper uses unique data collected in rural Pakistan to assess the extent to which consanguinity, which is widespread in North Africa, Central and West Asia, and most parts of South Asia, is linked to child cognitive ability and nutritional status. As economic benefits of marrying cousins may lead to upward bias in estimates of the effects of consanguinity on child outcomes, prior work likely underestimates the negative impacts of consanguinity on child outcomes.

Reports & Research
Journal Articles & Books
February 2017
India
Mauritania
Pakistan
Morocco
Brazil

Expansion and development of urban areas require acquisition of land, which, in turn, often requires physical relocation of people who own or occupy this land. Land acquisition and resettlement may also be required to improve the lives of the more than 1 billion people who currently live in slums around the world, most of them in developing countries. Therefore, any effort to embark on significant, sustainable urban development needs to ensure that there are adequate processes for land acquisition and, so that resettlement does not become a constraint to much needed urban development.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2016
Pakistan

Braided reaches of large rivers in alluvial plains show major morphological changes, particularly the external bank erosion, due to the flood events. This paper highlights the bank erosion and channel evolution induced by eleven different flood events in a 7-km long reach of the River Chenab, Pakistan. The impact of floods on river bank erosion and channel evolution is analyzed under low and high flow conditions.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2016
Pakistan

Conventional wisdom in many agricultural systems across the world is that farmers cannot, will not, or should not pay the full costs associated with surface water delivery. Across Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, only a handful can claim complete recovery of operation, maintenance, and capital costs; across Central and South Asia, fees are lower still, with farmers in Nepal, India, and Kazakhstan paying fractions of a U.S. penny for a cubic meter of water. In Pakistan, fees amount to roughly USD 1-2 per acre per season.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2016
Pakistan

This paper examines the fairness in distribution of water in a tertiary canal within the Indus Basin Irrigation System. Two methodologies are proposed: canal rating equations, and outlet discharge equations. The methodology is applied to a tertiary canal located in the Punjab, Province of Pakistan. Fairness/equity is expressed quantitatively using the Gini index. There is a difference in the estimated discharge depending on the methodology employed, however as we move along the canal the water allowance does not vary significantly with the distance along the canal.

Journal Articles & Books
December 2016
Pakistan

Here, more than 100 years of incumbency reports on officers of the irrigation bureaucracy of Punjab, Pakistan, are presented and analyzed. The data highlight how representation changed before and after partition within the irrigation bureaucracy. The data show that the irrigation bureaucracy increased through staffing its representation of local communities and is in its appointments responsive to elected representatives. Therefore, it is argued that empowerment of the local community can be achieved without irrigation management transfer but through the irrigation bureaucracy itself.