Mongolia

MNG

Mongolia

In the last two decades, Mongolia started a transition from a centrally planned economy to a free market economy. This change had led to ambiguous land rights, confusion over governance and increasing inequality in asset holdings, particularly for women. The agricultural sector accounts for the 23% of the national GDP, 43% of the population is rural and the 46 % of the rural population is poor.

The Constitution of 2002 established the rights of fair acquisition, possession and inheritance of property. It gives the state the right of eminent domain, prohibits ownership of land by foreign citizens and recognizes the rights of the Mongolian people to a safe and healthy environment. In addition, the Land Law of 2002 sets several provisions aiming at clarifying land rights and preserving pastures, and the Law on Mongolian Citizens’ Ownership of Land regulates the allocation of land for ownership, types and sizes of land that can be owned and defines the responsibilities of local administrations.

Disputes over land in Mongolia involve competing claims to water and pasture use, land distribution the expansion of protected areas for the inclusion of customary grazing areas, the property rights in areas of mining exploration and extraction. Disputes between individuals and the state are generally resolved by the governor of the higher level, while disputes between private individuals are settled by the local governor.

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Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
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    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

    Latest News

    Mokoro WOLTS Project
    Mongolia

    Just published in the Mokoro newsletter online, some initial reflections from Mokoro's WOLTS project research in Mongolia from Mokoro Research Officer and WOLTS team member Zoe Driscoll. WOLTS is a long-term multi-country strategic action research project which is initially investigating threats to women's land tenure security in pastoral communities affected by mining investments in Mongolia and Tanzania.

    Mongolia
    China

    By: Qiao Long
    Date: February 24th 2016
    Source: Radio Free Asia

    Traditional herding communities in a county-level district in China's northern region of Inner Mongolia have stepped up protests over the loss of their grasslands this week, local sources said.

    Ethnic Mongolian herders gathered in protest on Tuesday outside the offices of the Haliut township government in Inner Mongolia's Urad Middle Banner, according to local residents and a U.S.-based rights group.

    Latest Blog

    Goats getting ready for milking in the Khovd Province of Mongolia. Photo credit: © Eddie Game / The Nature Conservancy
    Global
    Mongolia
    Indonesia
    Australia

     

    By Yuta Masuda and Brian E. Robinson

    I’m sitting in a Mongolian yurt, listening to and trying to emulate Bataa’s* songs about love for the grasslands and the wide, treeless plains of the Mongolian Plateau. Our host sings with consuming passion. I might have brushed his enthusiasm off as a show two weeks ago. But after living and working in these grasslands, the feeling of freedom that comes from unobstructed, far-off distant horizon is infectious.

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    Displaying 1 - 6 of 483
    Journal Articles & Books
    December 2016
    Russia
    China
    Mongolia
    Asia

    Northeast Asia is an area with relative concentrations of resources, a complex ecological environment pattern, and a marked human—land contrast relationship. This area has significance for analyzing land cover patterns and variations for regional sustainable development among the trans-boundary areas of China, Russia, and Mongolia. In this paper, the transect analysis research tool and transfer matrix method are used to capture the regional land cover change characteristics by using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer(MODIS) datasets recorded from 2001 to 2012.

    Journal Articles & Books
    December 2016
    China
    Mongolia

    CONTEXT: The Mongolian Plateau, comprising Inner Mongolia, China (IM) and Mongolia (MG) is undergoing consistent warming and accelerated land cover/land use change. Extensive modifications of water-limited regions can alter ecosystem function and processes; hence, it is important to differentiate the impacts of human activities and precipitation dynamics on vegetation productivity. OBJECTIVES: This study distinguished between human-induced and precipitation-driven changes in vegetation cover on the plateau across biome, vegetation type and administrative divisions.

    Reports & Research
    December 2016
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    Mongolia

    Meeting Name: Commission on Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (CGRFA)
    Meeting symbol/code: CGRFA-16/17/15
    Session: Sess.16

    Journal Articles & Books
    December 2016
    Nigeria
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    Mongolia

    The Technical Guide on Pastoralism builds on a number of initiatives and studies from recent years that have shone a light on pastoral governance and land tenure: on the inherent challenges pastoralists face, the shortcomings of governments in securing pastoral tenure, and the emerging examples of success and progress from around the world. This Technical Guide provides solutions to securing pastoral governance and tenure without undermining the inherent, necessary complexity of customary arrangements.