2017-03-17 00:00:002014-07-01 00:00:001986-12-31 00:00:002017-02-01 00:00:002013-06-01 00:00:002009-09-17 00:00:002008-04-16 00:00:00 LBR | Land Portal

LBR

Liberia

Liberia

English

Liberia’s 14-year civil war—fueled in part by conflicts over land and natural resource rights—has had a devastating impact on the lives and livelihoods of its people. Today, more than a decade into the post-conflict reconstruction period, Liberians are working to rebuild their economy and institute reforms that would promote equitable access to land and resources, secure tenure, investment, and development. Progress, however, has been stymied by a host of challenges— from a lack of infrastructure to the Ebola epidemic in 2014. 

The country's land-tenure system reflects a long-standing division between the urban elite—the descendants of freed slaves from the US and Caribbean—and rural indigenous populations, which are largely dependent on agriculture for their livelihoods. Throughout coastal Liberia, the urban elites use a Western statutory system of land ownership based on individual fee simple titles. In the Liberian hinterland, indigenous Africans use their own customary systems, which are based on community or collective ownership of discrete territories. (USAID)

Some of the main land issues in Liberia today are: the legal status of customary land rights; the ownership of trees and other forest resources on community forest lands; displacement of local communities related to government land concessions for logging, mining, and large-scale agriculture; urban poverty; and women’s land rights. 

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Indicators

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Infographics

Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    Legend
    • Very Good Practice
    • Good Practice
    • Weak Practice
    • Very Weak Practice
    • Missing Value

    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
    • Fully adopt
    • Partially adopt
    • Not adopted
    • Missing Value

    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen. The indicators of this dataset assess national laws against Section 16 of the VGGT standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in the VGGTs.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

    Latest News

    Amid Delays, Citizens Increase Pressure on Lawmakers to Pass Land Right Act

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    Friday, March 17, 2017

    MONROVIA, Montserrado – Agnes Gardia, a farmer in Montserrado, believes that existing laws on land ownership put farmers at a disadvantage because they have no regard for community ownership of land.

    “Recently, while carrying out my farming works, the land I am gardening on was sold to another person by a member of a family claiming ownership. The new owner has asked me to remove my crops because he is ready to carry out his construction works,” she said. “Where then do I go, and how possible is it to relocate my crops when it’s not even ready for harvest?”

    Sharing The Economic Benefits Of Urban Agriculture

    By: Judoemue Kollie

    Date: 11 January 2017

    Source: Daily Observer

    An increasing number of residents in Monrovia and its suburbs are involved in urban farming for income generation and food security.

    Urban and peri-urban farming is the growing of crops and raising of animals within and around cities. It also involves the production of inputs, processing, marketing, and the provision of services to agricultural producers and agro-entrepreneurs.

    Library

    Displaying 1 - 6 of 109

    Tenure and Investment in Africa

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    This synthesis of our findings from an investigation of tenure risk in East, West, and Southern Africa, shows that a majority of tenure disputes are caused by the displacement of local peoples, indicating that companies and investors are not doing enough to understand competing claims to the land they acquire or lease. This failure in diligence is particularly noteworthy given that a majority of the disputes analyzed had materially significant impacts: indeed, a higher proportion of projects in Africa are financially impacted by tenure dispute than any other region in the world. 

    Resource information

    February 2017

    Taking the land without encumbrances

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    Liberia’s government seeks to put greater emphasis on integrated cash/food crop systems with broad-based farmer participation. However, shortcomings in regulations on land transactions could threaten livelihoods in what is already a vulnerable country.

    Resource information

    June 2013