Liberia

LBR

Liberia

Liberia’s 14-year civil war—fueled in part by conflicts over land and natural resource rights—has had a devastating impact on the lives and livelihoods of its people. Today, more than a decade into the post-conflict reconstruction period, Liberians are working to rebuild their economy and institute reforms that would promote equitable access to land and resources, secure tenure, investment, and development. Progress, however, has been stymied by a host of challenges— from a lack of infrastructure to the Ebola epidemic in 2014. 

The country's land-tenure system reflects a long-standing division between the urban elite—the descendants of freed slaves from the US and Caribbean—and rural indigenous populations, which are largely dependent on agriculture for their livelihoods. Throughout coastal Liberia, the urban elites use a Western statutory system of land ownership based on individual fee simple titles. In the Liberian hinterland, indigenous Africans use their own customary systems, which are based on community or collective ownership of discrete territories. (USAID)

Some of the main land issues in Liberia today are: the legal status of customary land rights; the ownership of trees and other forest resources on community forest lands; displacement of local communities related to government land concessions for logging, mining, and large-scale agriculture; urban poverty; and women’s land rights. 

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parts indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

Indicators

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Infographics

Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    Legend
    • Very Good Practice
    • Good Practice
    • Weak Practice
    • Very Weak Practice
    • Missing Value

    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
    • Fully adopt
    • Partially adopt
    • Not adopted
    • Missing Value

    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

    Latest News

    10 May 2017

     

    MONROVIA – When Liberia signed a series of contracts with international palm oil producers in the years after its protracted civil war, the news was greeted by some as a welcome sign of national renewal. Despite criticism voiced by local and international advocacy groups that the massive deals amounted to “land grabs,” the prospect of tens of thousands of jobs, tax revenues for a cash-starved government, and repaired roads and ports was too much for Liberian officials to pass on.

    3 May 2017

     

    Monrovia - Amid the prolonged delay in the passage of the Land Rights Act into law, the Civil Society Working Group on land rights in collaboration with its partners are doing everything possible to ensure the passage of the act.

    The group, in collaboration with the Rights and Rice Foundation on Monday, May 2, held a one-day national consultation dialogue with many organizations on the passage of the draft Land Rights Act.

    5 May 2017

    Dr. Othello Brandy, chairman of the Liberia Land Authority (LLA), on Tuesday told a gathering of civil society organization (CSOs) that the country may likely go revert to serious crises if the Draft Land Rights Act is not passed by the current lawmakers before the end of their tenures.

    “If the act is not passed, it means only a few people will continue to have rights over your land, including the right to say what they do and not do with the land, because the tribal title that you hold for your land does not give any legitimate ownership right to you,” Brandy warned.

    23 March 2017

     

    Nimba County – Mariame Kamara had travelled from across the border in Djeke to Saclepea upon hearing that Liberian opposition Liberty Party was holding a political gathering in that town.

    Her hope was dashed as nothing was mentioned concerning the reason she travelled to this place. She could not even speak to politicians she had hoped to meet.

    The event was all about naming Harrison Karnwea as vice running mate to Cllr. Charles Brumskine. It was not about the Nimba land dispute.

    Library

    Displaying 1 - 6 of 120
    Legislation
    November 2002

    The Act consists of 115 sections divided into 13 Parts: Preliminary (I); General principles and objectives (II); Environmental impact assessment, audit and monitoring (III); Environmental quality standards (IV); Pollution control and licensing (V); Guidelines and standards for the management of the environment and natural resources (VI); Protection of biodiversity, natural heritage and the ozone layer (VII); Environmental restoration Order (VIII); Inspection, analysis and records (IX); International obligations (X); Information, access, education and public awareness (XI); Offences (XII); M

    Regulations
    September 2009

    This Regulation of the Forestry Development Authority (FDA) establishes the responsibilities of Person harvesting or making Commercial Use of Forest Resources under a Forest Resources License ("the Operator") with respect to the rights of private land owners and provides for a right of compensation to land owners harmed as a result of any activity or process carried out pursuant to a Forest Resources License. The Operator shall take all measures necessary to prevent harm to the property of private land owners resulting from operations, without limitation.

    Regulations
    September 2009

    This Regulation of the Forestry Development Authority (FDA), made National Forestry Reform Law of 2006 concerns sound approach to forest land use planning to maximize the benefits of forest land allocation to Liberian society as a whole. Forest land use planning must be consistent with national land use priorities in all sectors and proposed uses for forest lands must be validated locally to ensure the accuracy and legitimacy of the planning process, and the results reached.

    Legislation
    July 2009

    This Act provides with respect to the administration, structure, operations, powers, responsibilities and (additional) functions of the National Land Commission established immediately upon passing of this Act. The Commission shall be independent from the Government and shall propose, advocate and coordinate land reform policies, legislation and programmes in Liberia.

    Legislation
    October 2009

    This Act seeks to empower communities to fully engage in sustainable management and conservation of forests of Liberia by creating a legal framework that defines and supports community rights in the management and use of forest resources. It provides the legal framework that empowers local communities located in or near forest lands to access, manage, use and benefit from forest resources on those lands for sustenance and livelihood improvements as well as for community development. The Act provides for forestry land to be classified as Community forestry land.

    Reports & Research
    March 2017

    Global demand for timber, agricultural commodities, and extractives is a significant driver of deforestation worldwide. Transparent land-concessions data for these large-scale commercial activities are essential to understand drivers of forest loss, monitor environmental impacts of ongoing activities, and ensure efficient and sustainable allocation of land.