Liberia

LBR

Liberia

Liberia’s 14-year civil war—fueled in part by conflicts over land and natural resource rights—has had a devastating impact on the lives and livelihoods of its people. Today, more than a decade into the post-conflict reconstruction period, Liberians are working to rebuild their economy and institute reforms that would promote equitable access to land and resources, secure tenure, investment, and development. Progress, however, has been stymied by a host of challenges— from a lack of infrastructure to the Ebola epidemic in 2014. 

The country's land-tenure system reflects a long-standing division between the urban elite—the descendants of freed slaves from the US and Caribbean—and rural indigenous populations, which are largely dependent on agriculture for their livelihoods. Throughout coastal Liberia, the urban elites use a Western statutory system of land ownership based on individual fee simple titles. In the Liberian hinterland, indigenous Africans use their own customary systems, which are based on community or collective ownership of discrete territories. (USAID)

Some of the main land issues in Liberia today are: the legal status of customary land rights; the ownership of trees and other forest resources on community forest lands; displacement of local communities related to government land concessions for logging, mining, and large-scale agriculture; urban poverty; and women’s land rights. 

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Indicators

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Infographics

Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    • Very Good Practice
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    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
    • Fully adopt
    • Partially adopt
    • Not adopted
    • Missing Value

    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

    Latest News

    8 August 2017
    Liberia

    The Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) Working Group on Land Rights Act (LRA) has called on the legislature not to tamper with some of its provisions, saying it would defeat not only the fundamental purpose of the land reform, but also undermine peace, reconciliation, and development in Liberia.

    The group is a coalition of CSOs working on community land rights across Liberia that is currently engaging stakeholders and lawmakers on the passage of the Draft Land Rights Act.

    liberia agricultural landscape
    3 August 2017
    Liberia

    Monrovia - The Civil Society Working Group on Land Rights Reforms has expressed its dismay over the exclusion of CSOs and Liberians from the legislative consultative forum over the Land Rights Act between the Liberian Land Authority (LLA), lawmakers and other stakeholders.

    31 July 2017
    Tanzania
    Liberia
    China
    Myanmar
    India

    The application process for the 2018 Visiting Professionals Program is now open until August 20, 2017.

    Please click the link below to apply:

    DOWNLOAD VPP APPLICATION FORM 

    13 June 2017
    Liberia

    Monrovia - The Civil Society Working Group on Land Rights Reform has launched what appeared to be a last minute fight in persuading the 53rd National Legislature to pass the Land Rights Act before the dawn of the hefty campaign season, which will virtually end the workings of that assembly.

    In a press conference held in Monrovia on Monday, June 12, the CSO working group re-echoed their dismay over the delay of the passage of the bill and called on the law makers to act quickly as time is of the essence.

    Partners

    Library

    Displaying 1 - 6 of 207
    Reports & Research
    March 2017

    Global demand for timber, agricultural commodities, and extractives is a significant driver of deforestation worldwide. Transparent land-concessions data for these large-scale commercial activities are essential to understand drivers of forest loss, monitor environmental impacts of ongoing activities, and ensure efficient and sustainable allocation of land.

    Tenure and Investment in Africa cover image
    Reports & Research
    February 2017

    This synthesis of our findings from an investigation of tenure risk in East, West, and Southern Africa, shows that a majority of tenure disputes are caused by the displacement of local peoples, indicating that companies and investors are not doing enough to understand competing claims to the land they acquire or lease. This failure in diligence is particularly noteworthy given that a majority of the disputes analyzed had materially significant impacts: indeed, a higher proportion of projects in Africa are financially impacted by tenure dispute than any other region in the world. 

    Journal Articles & Books
    December 2016

    Desde las décadas de 1970 y 1980, la forestería comunitaria ha ido adquiriendo cada vez más popularidad, a partir del concepto de que las comunidades locales, cuando se les conceden suficientes derechos de propiedad sobre los bosques colectivos locales, pueden organizarse de forma autónoma y crear instituciones locales a fin de reglamentar el uso de los recursos naturales y manejarlos de forma sostenible.

    Journal Articles & Books
    December 2016

    Los bosques y los árboles respaldan la agricultura sostenible. Estabilizan los suelos y el clima, regulan los flujos de agua, ofrecen sombra y refugio y proporcionan un hábitat a los polinizadores y los depredadores naturales de plagas agrícolas. Asimismo, contribuyen a la seguridad alimentaria de cientos de millones de personas, para quienes constituyen fuentes importantes de alimentos, energía e ingresos. Sin embargo, la agricultura sigue siendo el principal factor de la deforestación a nivel mundial y, a menudo, las políticas agrícolas, forestales y de tierras no casan.

    Reports & Research
    December 2016

    This note focuses on the topic of access to land and land governance in protracted crises, providing some possible solutions illustrated by case studies from FAO interventions in such contexts. Protracted crisis represent a signal of alert on the fact that approaches proposed so far where not enough to deal with such a complexity. This is why a renewed thinking is needed, based on the concrete observations of local dynamics, making an effort to understand the positions and interests of the many diverse parties involved and moving out from a sectorial vision, towards a more holistic one.