Laos

LAO

Laos

A landlocked country of 7 million between the Mekong River and Annamite Cordillera, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR or Laos) has the lowest population density in Southeast Asia.[1] Officially, over 81% of land is classified as forest, and only 6.5% is arable land.[2] Actual natural forest cover, however, is estimated by the government at 40%, with a target to increase to 70% by 2020.[3] Some of the remaining area, considered as “damaged forest”, is sloping land used for cultivation.

Most members of the 49 recognized ethnic minority groups in Laos have traditionally subsisted from shifting (swidden) agriculture and forest products. Patterns of land use have been transformed through population displacements during and after the Indochina wars;[4] government policies to eradicate opium and swidden cultivation;[5] and relocation of hundreds of thousands of residents to new villages closer to roads and public services.[6]

The government of the Lao PDR prioritizes economic growth and poverty alleviation through “sustainable development of the nation’s rich natural capital and land,” particularly through encouraging private investment and granting concessions of state land to investors.[7] Forest, land, water, and mineral resources together make up more than half of the country’s wealth.[8] The national strategy to “turn land into capital”[9] has brought mining, hydropower, and agri-business land concessions to large areas of rural Laos, frequently turning small-scale farmers into landless laborers in the process. This represents an unprecedented transfer of land access from farmers to foreign investors.[10]

Source of the narrative

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parts indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

Indicators

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Infographics

Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    • Very Good Practice
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    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
    • Fully adopt
    • Partially adopt
    • Not adopted
    • Missing Value

    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

    Latest News

    3 April 2017

    The Regional Center for Social Science and Sustainable Development and the Mekong Land Research Forum will run a week-long intensive summer school on land research in the Mekong Region. The purpose of the summer school is to equip early-career academic and advocacy-oriented researchers with key concepts, access to existing research outputs, and knowledge of current land issues across the region in order to strengthen individual and networked research that is geared towards secure access to land amongst the region’s rural and urban poor.

    By: Alisa Tang
    Date: August 31st 2016
    Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation

    BANGKOK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Activists have called on U.S. President Barack Obama to press Laos on its human rights record on issues such as illegal land concessions and forced evictions, when he visits the Communist country next week.

    Obama is due to attend a meeting of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in the capital Vientiane, becoming the first U.S. president to visit Laos.

    By: Ron Corben & Bryan Lynn
    Date: August 1st 2016
    Source: VOA

    An international human rights organization says Southeast Asia is facing increasing conflicts and violence over land grab activity. A “land grab” relates to taking land quickly, forcefully and often illegally.

    Latest Blog

    Latest Events

    26 February 2017 to 28 February 2017

    Location

    Best Western Green Hill Yangon
    Myanmar
    MM

    Over the last 30 years, the nation states in the Mekong region have taken steps to reform their land policy to facilitate the efforts to end poverty, create wealth and grow their economies. To do this most effectively in this modern age requires the leveraging of technical innovations and data.

    Debate

    Closed
    13 February 2017 to 27 February 2017
    Facilitators
    Natalia Scurrah
    Terry Parnell
    n.sorensen

    From 13-27 February 2017, the Mekong Region Land Governance (MRLG) project and the Land Portal co-facilitated an online dialogue on the Recognition of Customary Tenure in the Mekong Region.

    Partners

    Library

    Displaying 1 - 6 of 535
    Regulations
    March 2014

    This Governmental Decree establishes that the scope of land cadastre shall be to provide state bodies of all levels, natural and legal persons with the informationrelated to land areas and land quality located within the boundaries of urban areas, local government, districts and at the national level.

    Regulations
    August 2008

    These Regulations implement provisions of the Mines and Minerals Development Act, 2008 with respect to a wide variety of matters such as: organization of mining cadastre offices; application for, or grant or renewal of a mining right or a mineral processing licence; transfer of a mining right or a mineral processing licence; permission for the abandonment of a mining area; alteration of or prospecting in a mining area; various matters relating to survey, mapping and certification.The central mining cadastre office in Lusaka shall administer mining rights and mineral processing licences.

    Legislation
    May 2006

    This Act establishes the Zambia Development Agency and the Trade and Industrial Development Fund and makes provision in general for economic development in Zambia. In certain cases, development requires a licence, permit or certificate of registration of the Board of the Agency.

    Legislation
    October 1999

    Point 26 of the paragraph 1 of the Article 9 is supplemented with the expression "land survey/mapping practices". Point 45 of the paragraph 1 of the Article 9 acquires a new wording. It reads as follows "formal acceptance, storage and processing of cereals and the by-products of their processing at grain-elevators". Paragraph 1 of the Article 12 is supplemented with the following sentence: "Export and import of some commodities (produce and service) are subject to obligatory licensing".

    Amends: Law No. 2200 (1995-04-17)

    Legislation
    April 1995

    This Law consists of 5 Chapters that contain 26 articles. Chapter 1 lays down the general provisions. Chapter 2 lists the types of activity that are subject to obligatory licensing. Chapter 3 determines licensing for export and import of commodities (produce service). Chapter 4establishes the modalities of issuing licences. Chapter 5 establishes liability for the infringement of the legislation currently in force on licensing.

    Legislation
    May 1989

    The aim of the Act is to provide a uniform intestate succession Law applying throughout the country; to make adequate financial and other provisions for the surviving spouse, children, dependants and other relatives of an intestate; to provide for the administration of the estates of persons dying not having made a will; and to provide for matters connected with or incidental to the foregoing.