Ethiopia

Located in Eastern Africa, north of Kenya, Ethiopia is an ecologically diverse country that is home to nine ethnically based states and two self-governing administrations. The economy is largely based on agriculture, with over 80% of the population engaged in the production of crops and livestock. With a growing population of over 80 million people, Ethiopia is also the most populous landlocked country in the world. On average farm sizes are small, with more than 85% of farming households on less than 2 hectares.

Historically, land governance in Ethiopia has been marked by significant control by the state over the allocation and use of land, as well as different approaches to the distribution of rural land implemented under various regimes. This has led to a lack of access to land and to insecure land tenure for the rural poor, particularly peasants, pastoralists, women and others who depend on land and other natural resources for their livelihoods.

Land certification initiatives have been expanded to millions of households nationwide generally with positive results, though critics call for greater measures to enhance tenure security and stimulate greater economic investments at the local level.

Some of the main land-related issues in the country include: improving land tenure security for smallholder farmers, pastoralists and women; coordination and harmonization among different institutions involved in land governance; greater transparency related to land leases to foreign investors.

Indicators

Land area is the total area (1'000 Ha) of the country excluding area under inland water bodies.

Measurement unit
1'000 Ha

Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

Measurement unit
Number

Rural population refers to the share (%) of people living in rural areas as defined by national statistical offices. It is calculated as the ratio between Urban Population and Total Population.

Measurement unit
Percentage

Total spending for agricultural reserch measured measured as a share of the value added from agriculture, forestry and fishing activities

Measurement unit
Percentage

Distribution of agricultural holders by sex (female - Share %) according to the FAO Land and Gender Database.

Measurement unit
Percentage

GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates.

Measurement unit
PPP$ 2011

Total funding for programmes still ongoing in January 2016 (US $).

Measurement unit
US$ (Current)

Total number of programmes still ongoing in January 2016

Measurement unit
Number

Mapping

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Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

Compare countries

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Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

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Land area is the total area (1'000 Ha) of the country excluding area under inland water bodies.

Arable land (1'000 Ha) is the land under temporary agricultural crops (multiple-cropped areas are counted only once), temporary meadows for mowing or pasture, land under market and kitchen gardens

Measurement unit
1'000 Ha

It measures the area (1'000 Ha) covered by forest.

Measurement unit
1'000 Ha

Permanent crops (1'000 Ha) - land cultivated with long-term crops which do not have to be replanted for several years (such as cocoa and coffee); land under trees and shrubs producing flowers, such

Measurement unit
1000 Ha

Permanent meadows and pastures - land used permanently (five years or more) to grow herbaceous forage crops, either cultivated or growing wild (wild prairie or grazing land).

Measurement unit
1000 Ha

Infographics

Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure


Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
  • Fully adopt
  • Partially adopt
  • Not adopted
  • Missing Value

Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

Please, select year and panels to show the info.

    Legend
    • Very Good Practice
    • Good Practice
    • Weak Practice
    • Very Weak Practice
    • Missing Value

    Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parties indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

    Media

    Latest News

    14 November 2017
    Ethiopia

    Can better weather information help Ethiopians better deal with unpredictable weather?

    ARGOBA, Ethiopia, Nov 13 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Armed with a spear and undeterred by the intense sunlight, Tarekegn Kareto meticulously plucks weeds in his maize field in Argoba village, in southern Ethiopia.

    "With both dry weather and unusually heavy rains hitting us in the past year, I've lost over half of my harvest of maize and sorghum," he said, pausing to wipe sweat off his forehead.

    3 May 2017
    Ethiopia

     

    ADDIS ABABA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Aworar Meka had been living and working at the Reppi rubbish dump in Addis Ababa for only one month when tragedy struck.

    A giant landslide at the 50-year-old dump, the Ethiopian capital's only landfill site, hit his neighborhood on March 11, destroying dozens of homes and killing at least 115 people.

    Meka was one of the lucky ones; the 28-year-old, his wife, and young son survived. Their home, a makeshift tent made of tarpaulin and corrugated iron, narrowly avoided being crushed.

    31 March 2017
    Global
    Ethiopia
    Kenya
    Rwanda

     

    its4land is an EU-financed project to assist Kenya, Rwanda and Ethiopia in mapping land tenure more quickly, cheaply and transparently. It will end in three years’ time; right now, the Africans and Europeans are in the phase of needs assessment. The focus is not on technical requirements, but on operational priorities and managerial context. The first results indicate that low-cost geospatial technologies will be helpful, not least because they also benefit priorities other than improving cadastral services.

    Ethiopia

    By Desta Gebrehiwot
    Date: November 15th 2016
    Source: AllAfrica.com / The Ethiopian Herald

    The United Nations International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) stressed the need for rehabilitating dry lands in order to cope with the negative impacts of climate change, land degradation and drought.

    Latest Events

    14 November 2017 to 17 November 2017

    Location

    Addis Ababa
    Ethiopia
    ET
    Africa
    Ethiopia
    The Africa We Want: Achieving socioeconomic transformation through inclusive and equitable access to land by the youth
     
    TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2017 TO FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2017
     
    Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Organizations

    Library

    Displaying 1 - 6 of 1132
    Reports & Research
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    August 2017
    Ethiopia
    Africa

    This paper evaluates the effect of the Rural Capacity Building Project, which aimed at promoting growth by strengthening the agricultural service systems in Ethiopia and by making them more responsive to smallholders' needs. The project intended to increase the outreach of agricultural extension services to help farmers become aware of and adopt economically viable and environmentally sustainable technologies and practices. The paper examines the impact of the Rural Capacity Building Project using panel data on 1,485 geographically dispersed households in project and control kebeles.

    Enabling access to clean agricultural inputs and technologies: Improving farmer yields and businesses turnover cover image
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    August 2017
    Ethiopia

    Supporting the agriculture sector

    The GoE with technical support from the Land Investment for Transformation (LIFT) programme is issuing Second Level Land Certificates (SLLC) to increase the land tenure security of farmers. As a result, farmers are more willing to invest in their land in a productive and sustainable way. However, to allow for increased productive investment, farmers must have access to improved agri-inputs and technologies that are climate smart: this is currently a challenge in most rural areas.

    Promoting financial inclusion: Developing an innovative SLLC-linked loan product cover image
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    August 2017
    Ethiopia

    Microfinance institutions (MFIs) in Ethiopia are offering farmers a new financial product: the SLLC-linked individual loan product

    With Second Level Land Certification (SLLC), MFIs have the security of knowing the ownership and exact landholding size of farmers. This has allowed the development of an innovative individual lending product that uses the produce of the land as a form of guarantee.

    Formalising land rental transactions cover image
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    August 2017
    Ethiopia

    How LIFT promotes formalisation
     

    Promoting financial inclusion cover image
    Policy Papers & Briefs
    August 2017
    Ethiopia

    With Second Level Land Certification (SLLC), farmers gain increased security of tenure: this incentivises them to invest more in their land.

    To allow for this productive investment to take place, the Land Investment for Transformation (LIFT) programme is working with micro finance institutions (MFIs) to roll out an innovative financial product: the SLLC-linked individual loan.

    Accessing longer terms and larger size loans allows farmers to increase the productivity of their land, graduate from subsistence farming, and become more commercially oriented.