Cameroon

CMR

Cameroon

Despite the abundance of its natural resources, in Cameroon 40% of the population is poor, especially women and children, and concentrated in rural areas.

The Constitution of 1996 states that citizens have the right to own property individually or in association with others. Two Ordinances also regulate land tenure in Cameroon; Ordinance No. 74-1 of 1974 and Ordinance No. 74-2 of 1974 have created a tenure system based on land registration. All privately-owned land must be registered in order to be considered private land. National land includes unoccupied land and land held under customary law. Rural land is generally regulated by customary law, which is managed by traditional local leaders who serve as land administrators; they give rights to individual families, and generally these rights are heritable through the male line.

Due to changing land use patterns, land degradation and lack of specific land policies, land disputes are common in Cameroon. In addition, as Cameroon does not have a system of cadastre and the costs for the registration of the land are high, land conflicts related to land transactions and land records are also frequent.

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Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
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    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen, with support from Daniel Babare and Myat Noe (LLB Students, University of Groningen). The indicators assess national laws in 50 countries across Asia, Africa, and Latin America against international standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement as established by Section 16 of the VGGTs.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in section 16 of the VGGTs. Hold the mouse against the small "i" button above for a more detailed explanation of the indicator.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

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    Displaying 1 - 6 of 216
    Journal Articles & Books
    September 2016

    This paper assesses past trends in agricultural land and labour productivity, as a test whether it is feasible to meet the SDG target 2.3, namely doubling productivity and incomes of smallholders within a 15-year time span, if history were to serve as a guide. The target implies agricultural productivity would need to increase by 4.6% per year on average during 2015-2030. Available country-level data on land productivity (1961-2012) and labour productivity (1980-2012) for 140 countries shows that past trends fall well short of the desired pace of productivity growth.

    Journal Articles & Books
    December 2015

    <i>Towards effective national forest funds</i> addresses the need for more information on the way NFFs work and how best to establish and manage them. It shares the lessons that have emerged from the establishment and management of NFFs with the aim of supporting countries in designing and operating NFFs effectively according to their specific needs and circumstances.