BOL

Bolivia

Bolivia

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Land has always been a fundamental issue in Bolivia. It is the backbone of demands by the country’s peasant and indigenous movements. Thus, it also has been part of government programs and of other national actors´ agendas.

The debate was traditionally focused on Agrarian Reform, which establishes that "the land belongs to those who work it.” For this reason, it created tensions between peasants and landowners. However, in recent years, as the rights of Indigenous Peoples were increasingly recognized, the right to territory was expressed as a type of property right. Special attention was also given to the use of natural resources for indigenous populations. This has made agrarian land tenure more complex, with three fundamental actors (peasants, indigenous people and businesspeople) competing against each other for land and rights to land. Now, economic interests are vying for control of the country’s most productive lands, the expansion of agrarian capitalism is in the hands of national and transnational corporation, and national and subnational governments are implementing contradictory policies. There is growing debate over food security and sovereignty, and on the need to produce healthy and nutritious food for the country's population.

Disclaimer: The data displayed on the Land Portal is provided by third parts indicated as the data source or as the data provider. The Land Portal team is constantly working to ensure the highest possible standard of data quality and accuracy, yet the data is by its nature approximate and will contain some inaccuracies. The data may contain errors introduced by the data provider(s) and/or by the Land Portal team. In addition, this page allows you to compare data from different sources, but not all indicators are necessarily statistically comparable. The Land Portal Foundation (A) expressly disclaims the accuracy, adequacy, or completeness of any data and (B) shall not be liable for any errors, omissions or other defects in, delays or interruptions in such data, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon. Neither the Land Portal Foundation nor any of its data providers will be liable for any damages relating to your use of the data provided herein.

Indicators

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Infographics

Land Governance Assessment Framework (LGAF)

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    Legend
    • Very Good Practice
    • Good Practice
    • Weak Practice
    • Very Weak Practice
    • Missing Value

    Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure

    Legend: National laws adoption of the VGGT principle
    • Fully adopt
    • Partially adopt
    • Not adopted
    • Missing Value

    Note: The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security (The VGGTs) were endorsed by the Committee on World Food Security in 2012.

    The "VGGT indicators" dataset has been created by Nicholas K. Tagliarino, PhD Candidate at the University of Groningen. The indicators of this dataset assess national laws against Section 16 of the VGGT standards on expropriation, compensation, and resettlement.

    Each indicator relates to a principle established in the VGGTs.

    Answering the questions posed by these indicators entails analyzing a broad range of national-level laws, including national constitutions, land acquisition acts, land acts, community land acts, agricultural land acts, land use regulations, and some court decisions.

    Media

    Latest News

    The Rights of Nature: Indigenous Philosophies Reframing Law

    Sunday, January 15, 2017

    Indigenous battles to defend nature have taken to the streets, leading to powerful mobilizations like the gathering at Standing Rock. They have also taken to the courts, through the development of innovative legal ways of protecting nature. In Ecuador, Bolivia and New Zealand, indigenous activism has helped spur the creation of a novel legal phenomenon -- the idea that nature itself can have rights.

    Latest Blog

    When indigenous peoples have access and rights to their lands, nature and people are better off Image: REUTERS/Roosevelt Cassio

    Indigenous peoples are the real climate experts. So why aren't we listening to them?

    By Gina Cosentino, Social Development Specialist, World Bank and Climate Investment Funds

    Everything old is new again, at least when it comes to searching for workable and proven solutions to addressing climate change. Indigenous peoples have developed, over time, innovative climate-smart practices rooted in traditional knowledge and their relationship with nature.

    Latest Events

    III Continental Summit of Indigenous Communication of Abya Yala to be presented at UNPFII 2016

    14 November 2016 to 18 November 2016

    Location

    Tiquipaya, Department of Cochabamba
    Bolivia
    BO

    The III Continental Summit of Indigenous Communication of Abya Yala will be officially presented at this year’s session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. The event will take place on Wednesday, May 18th from 6:15 to 7:30 PM at the CR7 room in the United Nations building in New York, in an event organized by a delegation from Bolivia, as well as by delegates from other member countries of the International Commission of the Summit.

    Debate

    Urban Land Conflicts in Latin America and the Caribbean

    23 January 2017 to 24 February 2017
    Facilitators
    Raquel Ludermir Bernardino
    Maria Luisa Alvarado

    In Latin American and the Caribbean region (LAC), millions of families lack access to land for shelter or live in insecure tenure under a constant threat of being evicted from their homes. Land conflicts and forced evictions are increasingly reported and a key issue in the advocacy agenda of civil society and grassroots organizations.

    Open

    Collective property in South America, challenges and prospects

    23 October 2016 to 25 November 2016
    Facilitators
    Alejandro Diez
    gonzalocolque
    Sergio Coronado
    Juan Pablo Chumacero

    Generally, most rural land in the world has been in the hands of local peasant communities and indigenous peoples under customary land tenure systems; historically although, land ownership in rural areas, and natural resources contained in it, have been a source of tension between different actors with different ways to understand and take ownership. In this conflict of interest, usually rural and indigenous communities with collective forms of property, have lost out.

    Closed

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    Cheese versus poverty

    Smallholder communities in the Bolivian highlands have managed to conquer hunger: cheese production o? ers great hope to the people of the Peñas Valley. Cheese provides healthy nourishment for their children, generates additional income for families, and stimulates the local economy. Education is a decisive factor.

    Resource information

    January 2010

    Property Rights and Resource Governance Country Profile: Bolivia

    This resource is a USAID land tenure country profile that provides information on fundamental land tenure issues, including tenure types, legal frameworks, and land administration and institutions. This country profile is divided into the following sections: Summary/overview, Land, Freshwater, Trees and Forests, Minerals, and Data Sources.

    Resource information

    December 2011