Asia

Area code (UN M.49)
142

Confronting the environmental consequences of the Green Revolution in Asia

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Intensive double or triple monocropping of rice has caused degradation of the paddy micro environment and reductions in rice yield growth in many irrigated areas in Asia. Problems include increased pest infestation, mining of soil micronutrients, reductions in nutrient-carrying capacity of the soil, build-up of soil toxicity, and salinity and waterlogging.

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December 1994

Degradación del suelo

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Global population in the year 2020 will be a third higher than in 1995, but demand for food and fiber will rise by an even higher proportion, as incomes grow, diets diversify, and urbanization accelerates. However this demand is met, population and farming pressure on land resources will intensify greatly. There is growing concern in some quarters that a decline in long-term soil productivity is already seriously limiting food production in the developing world, and that the problem is getting worse. Sarah Sherr first focuses on the magnitude and effects of soil degradation.

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December 1999

La degradation des sols menacera-t-elle, d'ici 2020, la sécurité alimentaire des pays en developpement?

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La population mondiale en 2020 sera de 30% superieure a celie de 1995, mais la demande en denrees alimentaires et fibre augmentera d'un pourcentage encore plus eleve au fur et a mesure de la croissance des revenus, de la diversification des regimes alimentaires et de I'acceleration de I'urbanisation. Quelle que soit la maniere dont cette demande sera remplie, la pression demographique et agricole exercee sur les ressources fonciere s'intensifiera sensiblement.

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December 1999

Household decisions, gender, and development: a synthesis of recent research

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This book synthesizes IFPRI's recent work on the role of gender in household decisionmaking in developing countries, provides evidence on how reducing gender gaps can contribute to improved food security, health, and nutrition in developing countries, and gives examples of interventions that actually work to reduce gender disparities. It is an accessible, easy-to-read synthesis of the gender research that IFPRI has undertaken in the 1990s.

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December 2003

Methods of consensus building for community based fisheries management in Bangladesh and the Mekong Delta

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A method of consensus building for management of wetlands and fisheries using a systematic approach to participatory planning and initially developed in Bangladesh is now being applied in both Bangladesh and the Mekong delta. The method recognizes diversity in livelihoods and works through a structured learning and planning process that focuses on common interests. It works with each category of stakeholder separately to prioritize the natural resource problems that their livelihoods are largely dependent on, they then share and agree common priorities in plenary.

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December 2003

Food for education in Bangladesh

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Pervasive poverty and undernutrition persist in Bangladesh. About half the country’s 130 million people cannot afford an adequate diet. Poverty has kept generations of families from sending their children to school, and without education their children’s future will be a distressing echo of their own. Furthermore, from birth, children from poor families are often deprived of the basic nutritional building blocks that they need to learn easily. Consequently, the pathway out of poverty is restricted for children from poor families.

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December 2003

Mother-father resources, marriage payments, and girl-boy health in rural Bangladesh

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Agrowing body of literature suggests that men and women allocate resources under their control in systematically different ways.

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December 2003

Resource allocation and empowerment of women in rural Bangladesh

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The bargaining power of men and women crucially shapes the resource allocation decisions households make (Quisumbing and de la Brière 2000). Husbands and wives often use their bargaining power to express different priorities about how resources should be allocated. Understanding these differences and their effects is critical if policymakers are to improve livelihoods. Increasing the bargaining power of one gender group rather than another can mean the difference between policy failure and policy success.

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December 2003