Africa

Africa is the world's second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. At about 30.2 million km² (11.7 million sq mi) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of the Earth's total surface area and 20.4% of the total land area.[2] With 1.0 billion people (as of 2009, see table) in 61 territories, it accounts for about 14.72% of the world's human population.

Publication date
January 2010

The ten ASARECA member countries (Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda) have adopted, or are planning to adopt, a range o

Publication date
January 2015

Using a participatory rural appraisal approach, a series of qualitative studies were conducted in four countries facing negative impacts of climate change—Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Kenya and Mali—in or

Publication date
January 2009

Ethiopia’s national development strategy, A Plan for Accelerated and Sustained Development to End Poverty for 2005/06 to 2009/10 (PASDEP) places a major emphasis on achieving high rates of agricult

Publication date
January 1999

This paper investigates empirically the factors that influence real agricultural wage rates in Ghana, based on 1957 to 1991 data.

Publication date
January 1999

In response to slow growth in the agricultural sector and as part of a general shift towards a more market-oriented economy, the Government of Egypt started liberalizing the agricultural sector in

Publication date
January 1996

This paper examines the current status of HIV/AIDS infection, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, and reviews existing models that look at the future impact that the disease is likely to have on po

Publication date
January 2004

Data from many countries show that the concentration of poverty and malnutrition is shifting from rural to urban areas.

Publication date
January 2014

The United Nations declared 2014 the International Year of Family Farming.

Publication date
January 2009

Because of their spatial scale, most irrigation systems, forests, rangelands, and fisheries cannot be managed at the individual or household level (Knox McCulloch, Meinzen-Dick, and Hazell 1998).

Publication date
January 2011

Most conflicts in the developing world take place in rural areas, displacing large numbers of civilians and disrupting their agricultural livelihoods.

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